Mara’s arrows__refugees_edited
Mara’s arrows__refugees_edited

press to zoom
Mara’s arrows__refugees (2)
Mara’s arrows__refugees (2)

press to zoom
Mara’s arrows__refugees (1)
Mara’s arrows__refugees (1)

press to zoom
Mara’s arrows__refugees_edited
Mara’s arrows__refugees_edited

press to zoom
1/3

Click in the photo to enlarge

Refugees, 2019 - 2020

Migue Monti

U$ 3.000 + tax and shipping

DIMENSIONS

36 x 26" | 91.44 x 66.04 cm

TECHNIQUE

Spray, acrylic on canvas

  About the artwork  

"We are, above all, spirits, but we are not taught to see ourselves that way, as it makes no sense to the system, which wants subjects that are alienated, disconnected from themselves, debilitated, and easy to manipulate through entertainment." 

 

This work invites a diversity of interpretations, as it blends a strong socio-political and historical sense with subtle spirituality. At first glance, its imagery is a clear denunciation of the treatment of refugees and the most vulnerable, repressive, nearly demonic power of military force in various iterations. Yet the work also suggests a space for Unity, with the clearly delineated central figure alluding to a story of Gautama Buddha. Siddhartha Gautama, seated beneath the Bodhi Tree, was attacked by the army of Mara (a force representing the illusion of separation). Despite the attack, Siddhartha remained still and untouched. Having recognized Unity, the Buddha perceived the demons as unreal, unable to reach pure consciousness in the ignorance of their own identity. The arrows of Mara become flowers in proximity with the Buddha. 

 

The wooden frame for the piece was found discarded in a street dumpster amongst construction rubble. Broken in several places, it was repaired and stretched with canvas. On the back, there is a quote from the Ashtavakra Gita (“On Bondage and Liberation”) in graphite.

 

This work denounces racism in all of its manifestations, especially against Black and Indigenous people, as well as suggests the creation of space for recognizing Unity.

Mara’s arrows__refugees (1).JPG

 About the artist 

“We all have the potential to use this tool (art). It exists within each one, it is not exclusive to me or to a select group”. Migue feels that art is an enormously powerful tool that allows access to the consciousness of unity and, thus, illuminates that which we ignore about ourselves. “Art is liberty, it’s the child being themselves, without concepts, in unity. My paintings come from this place, my creative process is very intuitive, it comes from everyday life, from the exchange of ideas, from travel experiences, but overall and mainly from silence.” Monti does not see himself as an artist because for him, art is something subtle and unexplainable, and, in his view, what he does is ‘very social’. For him, art is more than a means of expression. It is a form of revolution and a connection with existence. 

 

Born in Tucumán, Argentina, Migue Monti spent his childhood in Madrid, Spain, where he had his first encounters with painting. Later, back from Europe, he abandoned undergraduate studies in psychology in favor of extensive backpacking experiences throughout South America. In 2017 he graduated with a degree in Language and Literature from the University of Estácio de Sá in Rio de Janeiro. Monti works in a variety of media and modes of artistic expression: painting, photography, poetry, collage, ceramics, mosaic, sculpture, graffiti, and macramé. His artistic production is a reflection of all of his cultural exchange experiences in South America, Europe, and Asia, and it takes two defined directions: One, its social content, directed at workers in their everyday life, in Street Art,  movement of life in all its poetic spontaneity as well as its oppressive manifestations. The second direction is spiritual. A kind of research toward self-understanding through meditation and yoga. With inspiration from photography and street art, and with work sold in Portugal, India, France, Peru, Spain, the United States, Argentina, and Brazil, Miguel does not define art, he simply makes use of it as a way to access the depths of being.  

 

"Imposed and hegemonic society ponders intellect to the detriment of our intuition. By disconnecting from ourselves, we are more susceptible to being dragged along by this alienating whole that wants us asleep".

Refugees is in New York City and it can be viewed in person, by appointment. Please don’t hesitate to send us an email to: contact@urbanartrevolution.com

 

With the sale of Refugees a contribution will be made in favour of www.sosebkids.org 

  • Instagram